THE ILLUSIONIST DRY GIN

A premium, blue gin perfect for bartenders, connoisseurs and gin enthusiasts
The iconic black matte bottle of The Illusionist Dry Gin.
The iconic black matte bottle of The Illusionist Dry Gin turned around.
The iconic black matte bottle of The Illusionist Dry Gin&
The iconic black matte bottle of The Illusionist Dry Gin laying down.

THE ILLUSIONIST DRY GIN 500ML

500ml, 45% Vol.

There’s a story to be told within the bottle: a light breeze of liqourice root, earthy-warm mace, fruity citrus peels and a mysterious blue flower from the far east. Distilled in a potstill, filled into black, art-nouveau stylized vessels. Come closer and let yourself be enchanted.

In stock and ready to ship, ca. 2 - 4 business days, within GERMANY only.

*All prices incl. 19% VAT and shipping*

*Organically certified, DE-ÖKO 060*

The blue hue stems from natural ingredients used in our recipe. Clitoria ternatea, also known as butterfly pea flower, is a common ingredient that gives our gin its distinct aroma and as a bi-product turns our gin blue. By introducing the organic Clitoria ternatea as an aroma, along with other organic botanicals in our recipe, the Illusionist Dry Gin ensures we achieve the perfect color and taste with every batch of gin we produce.

4.8 BASED ON OVER 4.500 REVIEWS

Their fruity gin is pure magic
Inka K.
Great gin with a wow-effect!
Kevin W.
The Illusionist Gin is absolutely delicious!
Paik A
For any gin connoisseur, a must-have!
Michelle W.
...magnificent gin with a wonderful blue colour
Edison Y.
The taste is not an illusion... it's genuine and stimulating
Tastillery
OUT OF THE BLUE

Our gin is characterized by its deep, royal blue color derived from a unique flower from the far east. Come closer and let yourself be enchanted.

Unravel the secret of the Illusionist: A deep blue gin, that augments you from your daily sloth, and upon mixing with tonic, delivers the gentle yet enticing pink elixir. Born in the locale Glockenbach of Munich, ready for new adventures.

THE COLOR CHANGING GIN

Blend our gin together with an acidic mixer, such as tonic water, and watch as our deep blue hue transform into gentle pink.

PINK
is the new
BLUE

PRODUCT FAQ's

The Illusionist Dry Gin has an alcohol content of 45 percent. The high alcohol quotient prevents gin from going bad. Once you open your bottle of Illusionist Dry Gin, you don't have to put it in the fridge. Ideally, consumers should store their gin out of direct sunlight and the best storage locations include cool, dark shelves or cupboards. You should also ensure the lid is sealed tightly so the gin retains its flavor for as long as possible.

The Illusionist Dry Gin lasts a minimum of two years from the day you open it if it's stored in a suitable location. You can opt to store your gin in your freezer, which could extend its life span but you won't be given the full aromatic profile as when it's stored at room temperature. You can also put it in the fridge, particularly if you don't have a suitable storage place. Some people prefer drinking cold gin because the cool temperature produces a silkier texture.

Gin was used for medicinal purposes long before it became an alcoholic beverage of choice. European monks were among the first to produce gin. Traditional gin recipes featured a grain mash and juniper berries, giving gin its original flavor. Eleventh-century Benedictine monks from Salerno, Italy, are often credited with the earliest concoctions that provided the foundation for the beverage known as gin today. Its name is a shortened variation of the word juniper.

The texture and taste of gin can differ from one brand to another. Both the method of production and production location impact its texture and taste. A professor of medicine in Holland combined spirits and distilled juniper berries in the 1600s to produce an affordable diuretic. Juniper berries were also used during the Black Plague to protect people from the illness. Juniper tonics became popular treatments for various medical issues, including colds, cramps, and pains. This medicine soon became a popular beverage in England.

Today, gin from the Netherlands is produced from a fermented barley malt mash. This mash is the same mash used to make beer. The malt goes through two distillations. The first time, it's turned into malt wine, which can be 55 percent alcohol. The malt wine is mixed with botanicals, including juniper berries, and goes through a second distillation process. The final product is a malty-flavored gin that's 35 percent alcohol.

American and English gin follows a different production process. American and English manufacturers purify their malt wine until it's flavorless and doesn't have a scent. At that point, the liquid is between 90 and 94 percent pure alcohol. Manufacturers mix the alcohol with juniper berries and other botanicals like orange peels. American and English gin producers create distinct botanical blends unique to their beverages and produce a dry gin. Some American producers opt to age their gin, which turns the beverage light gold.

Dry gins can be served on their own or mixed with other beverages, such as tonic water, to make cocktails.

Our founders developed the concept for the Illusionist Dry Gin in 2015. They began their adventure experimenting with different recipes and spent 18 months testing them with friends and family. The founders used private social gatherings to solicit valuable feedback that ended up forming the final flavour and aroma profile of the Illusionist. They used the feedback to refine their recipe, creating a fruity, floral, and surprising gin with a rich aroma and taste that has more to it than meets the eye.

Although it took over a year of testing to finalize the Illusionist Dry Gin recipe, the depth of knowledge needed to create a distinct brand of gin was something Tim Steglich and Max Muggenthaler began acquiring long before they discussed their vision. Their familiarity with different brands from around the globe gave them a starting point, allowing them to identify suitable botanicals they could mix to create a smooth gin. Their added affinity for cooking, especially Asian cuisine, further inspired the selection of botanicals and herbs.